The BRACING Series: No. 3

By Sean M Wheeler, M.D.

The simple exercises that target the small gluteus bracing muscles from the STABILITY Series No. 1 and No. 2, may at first appear as exercises meant for the very old or very weak, or as exercises done only until one is ready to go back to the gym for a "real" workout.

I'm here today to disavow you of this mistaken assumption.

Let me start with a story.

I have a middle-aged patient who is a record-setting weightlifter for his age and weight-group. He's in another universe of strong, like guys on ESPN2 named Magnus who fling beer kegs for prize money.

He came to see me with pain in the back and knee.

We found that his small bracing muscles of the gluteus were weakened and his compensation for this weakness was causing his pain.

I had to deliver this diagnosis to a professional power-lifter, and he wasn't easily persuaded.

I described bracing muscles and explained that rather than actively lifting the weight, these muscles instead stabilize the legs for walking hills and stairs, for jumping down, or for squatting, as he does to pick up the barbell.

Bracing muscle weakness destabilizes the leg, which can lead to pain in the knee, hip and back.

Finally, he experienced a breakthrough when he realized that while squatting down to pick up the bar he had to deeply concentrate to keep his left knee from buckling in.

He was compensating by actively pushing his left knee out as he bent down and stood back up with the weight, and he'd been doing it throughout his career.

After this realization, he spent the next several months working on some of the exercises I present in The STABILITY Series.

If small bracing muscles were strengthened by lifting weights, anyone with all of my client's years of experience and training would have developed strong and capable bracing muscles and wouldn't need to compensate by pushing the knee out.

Now, he starts every workout by doing his stabilization exercises, before working to strengthen his action muscles.

The goal is to view stability exercise as an entirely different type of exercise, and prioritize the stabilization workout as necessary and the weightlifting as secondary.

Proper bracing muscle stability allows action muscle strengthening without injury.

Weightlifting by itself doesn't provide stability, only strength.

As you watch and engage with these exercises, remember that they are designed to strengthen these bracing muscles that provide stability, and you should do them for as long as you are active, whether you choose to do a strength workout separately or not.

Stability Exercise #3: Deep Bracing Muscles of the Spine

This exercise is for the bracing muscles of the spine.

Be aware: this exercise is much harder to master than the gluteus exercises described earlier in this Series.

The first step is to locate and isolate the bracing muscle without compensating with the surrounding action muscles.  This may require spending days doing only the muscle-finding part before progressing to the actual exercise.

In the effort to find these muscles, make sure that you are not tightening your hamstrings or rotating your pelvis.

If this exercise proves too difficult to execute, you may need to consult with a physical therapist or other professional.

Good luck.

Published in The BRACING Series

The BRACING Series: No. 2

By Sean M Wheeler, M.D.

Spine stability is an inherent component in the design of our bodies.  

We gain spinal stability throughout childhood and early adulthood.

As infants, we can only stand once we achieve the stability to do so.  As toddlers, we crawl until we gain the strength in our bracing muscles to walk and then to run

With spinal stability comes a smooth daily coordination and balance for each of us, that demonstrates the power and inspiration of the human body, similar to the awe many experience in watching a professional athlete.  Our ascent to stability continues until derailed by injury or by a shift from an active life to one that is more sedentary.

Back pain often accompanies a sedentary lifestyle. In a futile attempt to sidestep the pain,  we stand and walk differently.  We avoid using the very muscles designed to stabilize the spine - the bracing muscles

And now our back hurts. 

Once the bracing muscles are no longer doing their job, they rapidly atrophy.  These muscles weaken, the spine destabilizes, and the spiral of chronic back pain deepens.  

In research studies observing the effect of weightlessness in outer space on different muscle groups, astronauts were tested for muscle strength before and after a two-week trip into space.  Researchers found that, during those two weeks in space, action-muscle strength (the muscles that move us) decreased by 5 percent in the arms and 7 percent in the legs, while bracing muscle stabilization of the spine (the crucial endurance muscles) decreased by up to 70 percent.  

While in space, astronauts continued to exercise their action muscles daily, but they couldn't consistently utilize their bracing muscles because of the absence of gravity. 

Bracing muscle strength is easy to lose but challenging to recover.  As adults, we can't reproduce the conditions and movement patterns of childhood development.

To repair our bracing muscles in the aftermath of injury or atrophy we need to target them with site-specific strengthening exercises, which is the purpose of the STABILITY Series.

Stability Exercise #2: The Hip Hiker

The bracing muscle exercise viewed above is called hip hiker.

In this exercise, keep both legs straight with your knees locked.  It's important to understand the hip being strengthened is the one that stabilizes as the other hip moves. 

Do 25-50 reps on each side. As the STABILITY Series continues, remember that you do not have to do all the exercises at once.  Do a couple of different exercises for your bracing muscles each day and become expert at each exercise.

I will introduce another exercise next week.  

Published in The BRACING Series

The BRACING Series, No. 1

By Dr. Sean M. Wheeler, M.D.

I have seen some strong patients in my twenty years of practicing medicine: bodybuilders, professional athletes, Pilates instructors, laborers and others who depend on strength for their work.  

"Weak" is not a term we would associate with them, but the longstanding back pain they suffer is the result of a weakness in a particular set of obscure muscles.  The weak muscles in these very strong patients are the bracing muscles, which are unique muscles that require a particular approach to strengthen. 

I introduce the concept of bracing muscles in my book, UPRISE--Back Pain Liberation by Tuning Your Body Guitar, which will have a major impact on the future care of back pain.  In my book I promise to develop a set of exercises targeting these muscles that can improve the stability of everyone, not just people with chronic back pain. 

Over the coming months, that promise will be fulfilled here as we release a series of videos to demonstrate these exercises. 

In a few weeks local gyms will fill with new members on a New Year's resolution bender, trying to get in shape for that spring vacation they've already purchased.  Many will focus on "core" training, which has become an industry in itself.  And yet an extraordinary number of people who are working on their core still experience back pain. 

This is because you have to get the spine stabilized before you can "get in shape."  

Six-pack abs boost your ego but not your stability.  Stability is the role of bracing muscles. 

Trying to exercise heavily when your spine is not yet stable is like trying to build a second story on a home with a cracked foundation.  It is an invitation to injury.

So which muscles are the bracing muscles? 

Truthfully, they can be hard to find.  They aren't muscles you can flex and impress yourself with in the mirror.  Exercising them doesn't build their size, it builds their endurance and circulation. 

There are six bracing muscles that pull your hip into a stable position in the socket, which collectively I call the gluteus stabilizers.  They work in conjunction with the psoas muscle and the pelvic floor muscles to suspend the hip in "mid-air" inside the hip joint, providing stability while allowing movement. 

When these bracing muscles weaken, the psoas spasms, the hip is pulled up into an impinged position and the pelvic floor weakens, leading to pain and dysfunction.  That's the theory, anyway.

Stability Exercise #1:  The Clamshell

The first exercise appearing in the video above is called a clamshell. 

The important points of technique are to keep the body rotation closed, stay leaning forward, and to keep the knee low.  As with any exercise, rushing through it is not helpful. 

Try to do 30-50 reps on each side every day for the next week until I introduce the next exercise. 

Good luck.

Published in The BRACING Series

Life can be busy any time of year, especially around the holidays.

The holidays often demand that we each deliberately make time for wellness and exercise.  Like any of our daily preventive habits for overall health like brushing our teeth, physical wellness works best when practiced regularly.

Maintaining strength and stability is essential for our health and best accomplished by including both endurance and circulation training for our bracing muscles, and dynamic workouts for our action muscles.  

Even if you only have 5 minutes to spare, science shows you can still reap multiple benefits from a quick workout

The New York Times recently published an article titled "Really, Really Short Workouts" by Tara Parker-Pope.

Pope outlines several short, high-intensity interval training [HIIT] workouts. Anyone with any experience, or none, and any amount of time can try different HIIT workouts, making adjustments as needed. These scientifically-proven workouts incorporate a warm-up, with peaks of high-intensity exercise separated by lower-intensity, and a cool-down

Pope enthusiastically insists:

"You can try it with any aerobic activity you like. The principles of H.I.I.T. can be applied to running, biking, stair climbing, swimming, jumping rope, rowing, even hopping or skipping. [Yes, skipping!]"

HIIT is a step-up from traditional advice that one should be able to maintain a conversation while running or working out: instead, one shouldn't be able to complete long-winded sentences. The focus is on increasing intensity to a point where chatting is difficult because the workout is challenging your body closer to its limits.

Pope recommends incorporating a HIIT workout three times a week.

Even the 4-minute workouts show an improvement in health benefits after 6 weeks. Benefits include increased endurance and lower glucose levels (even in diabetics, even in a single session). One study showed that even for those struggling with coronary artery disease, high-intensity interval training was not only safe—but better tolerated than a more moderate workout.

Additionally, HIIT burns more calories both before and after than continuous aerobic training. The intensity increases calorie consumption and your body continues burning calories for 2 hours after the workout.

The benefits of high-intensity interval training extend past mere increased calorie burn: people report more enjoyment from HIIT than moderate-intensity activity. This benefit has a two-fold effect: people stick to workouts that they enjoy. A short, consistent workout is better than sporadic exercise or no exercise at all.

HIIT also improves cardiovascular health by working out your blood vessels. Exercise physiologist and athletic trainer Scott Weiss, C.S.C.S. explains, “HIIT increases the flexibility and elasticity of arteries and veins better than continuous aerobic exercise. Because of the increased pressure demand of HIIT, the vessels actually get a workout as well.”

Arguably, the greatest gain of high-intensity interval training is in the shortened yet still highly effective workouts. Hectic schedules can incorporate HIIT into a lunch break or an early morning quiet time.

Your body craves both variety and stability - without stability, back pain can spoil a holiday; without variety, action muscles aren't challenged.    

All it takes is 5 minutes. Aim for variety, and most important, have fun.

[Image Source: Aurora Bootcamp]

Published in Back Pain Relief

20150620 STM920

Why is chronic back pain such a global problem with no widespread treatment moving us any closer to solving the condition?  
 
For the answer, consider these reasons:
  1. We work harder, longer, and play outside less and less.  Look around your office: it's a safe bet that most of your coworkers are sitting, including yourself. As a society, we're only starting to explore how destructive sitting is for our bodies.  
  2. We live in a world where exhaustion rules as a status symbol.  A person will answer the phone only to tell you for five minutes how busy, tired and stressed he or she is.  If we have back pain, we buckle down and keep moving.  
  3. Preventing disease and muscle weakness is a different type of work, the kind of which slips under our general awareness.  We don't get patted on the back for taking time off to work out over lunch or for breaking social norms like sitting at work. 
  4. It's easier to respond to urgent problems as they occur.  It remains far less common to be proactive and deal with important issues before they become problems.  In health care, this can be seen in the lack of focus on prevention.  Instead, current medical communities focus on what it can diagnose or treat.  
  5. Back pain progresses stealthily under a cloud of injuries, spine instability, and poor posture.  Additionally, your body compensates for weak bracing muscles (the ones you need to keep your spine stable and pain-free) like no other part of your body, making recognizing the root of back pain even more difficult.  We have nothing to compare it to, which means we need a new way to recognize causes and solutions.  
 
If you struggle with back pain and rely on customary medical advice, the odds are stacked against you.  Research results produced most recently essentially say nothing works when it comes to treating chronic back pain.  Our medical community's algorithms for treatment are flawed and failing.
 
Chronic back pain is a real problem for many of us, but there is a solution, which while simple in concept requires discipline.   
First, let's rewrite our understanding of what causes chronic back pain.
Second, as a patient, one must understand what to expect in treatment, and what works and what doesn't.  To instill your self-care discipline, seek a trained expert to show you how to care for our back to prevent chronic low back pain.
 
UPRISE: Back Pain Liberation, by Tuning Your Body Guitar, by back pain expert Dr. Sean Wheeler, offers the starting point for a new global conversation of chronic back pain treatment and relief.  
 
[Image Credit: The Lancet, Source: The Economist]

The POSTURE Series, No. 3

By Sean M. Wheeler, M.D.

In part 2 of our Posture Series I explained how to get your pelvis in the correct position. This correct pelvic position is the essence of good posture, to assist in avoiding chronic low back pain.

Drawing the tummy in, pulling the pelvis into the correct position, achieves good posture and builds the endurance strength to the very muscles which stabilize the spine.

Psoas Quadratus LumborumPsoas & Quadrates Lumborum
The concept may sound simple, but so much could go wrong.

Two Muscles At Work

There are two muscles around the spine called psoas and quadratus lumborum that work to lock the low back into a fixed position.

The psoas [red pointer in the image] runs up from the hip along the front of the spine and attaches to the spine above the level of the belly button. It is a very strong muscle that helps stabilizes the hip and causes many problems when it is not functioning correctly.

The quadratus lumborum [blue pointer] is a smaller muscle that runs from the top of the pelvis to the lowest rib, and most of the time, works with the psoas to lock the spine down.

Dr Sean Wheeler Locked Down SpineCollege student to-be practices moving to campusHeavy Lifting

Most of the day your spine is stabilized using deeper muscles called bracing muscles that stabilize while allowing normal motion of the spine.

When you pick up something heavy, this is the only time you switch to the psoas and quadratus lumborum. They provide an extra level of stability needed during lifting. So in a perfect world, 99% of the day your bracing muscles stabilize you and 1% of the day the psoas and quadratus lumborum lock you down to lift something heavy.

Spasm

With back pain, sometimes the psoas goes into spasm in a failed attempt to protect the back and hip. When the psoas spasms, it pulls the pelvis into a poor position and the lumbar spine forward. 

DrSeanWheeler Pelvis Position Illustration2The quadratus lumborum is then forced to contract all day to fight this spasm and it leads to irritation of the quadratus lumborum and muscular back pain.

Some people who have back pain then have two problems, the original cause of pain, plus the body trying to stabilize them further and causing more problems.

How can you unintentionally cause psoas spasm? By drawing your tummy in too forcefully when attempting to get your pelvis in the right spot. In this case, improving your posture can actually lead to back pain.

What To Do

Here’s what you do: draw your tummy in to pull your pelvis into a correct position where your head feels comfortable over your shoulders. Then rock your shoulders side-to-side to see if your lower back feels locked down. If it does, take a deep breath and start over.

Over time this will become easier and feel much more natural. Holding this position all day is very difficult as it takes bracing muscle endurance and that endurance strength takes 6 months to achieve. So be patient and persistent.

When To See A Medical Professional

If all of this sounds like gibberish and you can’t get your pelvis to do any of these things, you may need to see a professional. If your back is locked down when not heavy lifting and you suspect your psoas is in constant spasm, you may need to see a professional. Otherwise, let’s keep following this path towards better posture.

More To Come

Coming soon, why adult posture problems are different than those of the teenager.

 

Sean Wheeler, M.D. is board certified in both Pain Management and Sports Medicine. He is a leading expert on back pain and his recently released book UPRISE is changing the way the world approaches back pain. With a new vocabulary and new medical approach, Dr. Wheeler puts patients back in charge of their health to achieve liberation from chronic back pain. His oldest son Duke tried to imagine that he was lifting the pictured box while moving to college, but at the time of this column, he still has 4 months to wait.

Published in The Posture Series

The POSTURE Series, No. 2

By Sean M. Wheeler, M.D.

What brings any of us to a point where we are compelled to read an article about posture?

So instead of reading another article, why not just sit up straight?

If only.

In this second in a series, let's discuss the importance of pelvis position in good posture, and how poor pelvis position may indicate a deeper health concern: the possibility your body is losing its bracing functionality. A functionality vital to living without chronic back pain. 

Challenging Assumptions

One can set their phone to remind them to sit up, find a wearable device attempting to pull you into the correct position, and even special seats for posture assistance. New posture reminder devices are coming out all the time and yet…this article exists because good posture remains difficult to achieve.

Let’s start by challenging current thinking. One can’t just sit up straight to solve their posture problem. Not when the pelvis is in the wrong position.

Pelvis Tilted Forward

Dr Sean Wheeler Posture Pelvis ForwardPelvis forward looks like thisSome position their pelvis too far forward, tilted forward. Then they arch their back to get into an upright position. Most people have been taught this ‘pelvis-forward’ position is good posture.  

In fact, although no longer available, years ago I developed a posture App. In the first step I would tell users to maintain this pelvis-forward position. In a video accompanying the App I would explain that in this position your mid-back would get very sore after a few hours and that this was normal. Years later, I can tell you this is not normal.

I actually began to have back pain because of my will power and belief that I could eventually maintain this position all day.

It is reasonably embarrassing to be a published author on back pain and one of the world’s experts on back pain and to actually have back pain. This is NOT a correct position. The pelvis is too far forward.

Pelvis Tilted Backward

Dr Sean Wheeler Posture Pelvis BackwardModel demonstrates pelvis backwardThe next mistake is what is referred to as pelvis posterior [tilted backward]. With your pelvis in this position it is impossible to get your head over your shoulders.

People usually go back and forth between each of these two positions; pelvis tilted forward vs. tilted backward. Maintain one position until they get tired and then go to the other. Some people will spend their day standing with their pelvis forward and sit with their pelvis tilted backward.

Correct Pelvis Position

The correct position is somewhere in the middle. At this point, people will often attempt to roll their pelvis into a middle position. Unfortunately it is not that simple.

If you choose to just roll your pelvis, you will be able to get to good posture, but only when you are sitting.

Standing with your pelvis in the correct position requires bracing muscle strength, and hamstring and hip flexor muscle flexibility.

Improving Pelvic Position For Good Posture

As described in my book UPRISE: Back Pain Liberation, by Tuning Your Body Guitar, bracing muscles are the muscles that brace and stabilize you so you can move. But improving pelvic position can be a nice start on the whole process.

Sometimes people are so tight they can’t move, or so pelvic unaware that they need exercises to loosen and become aware of pelvic position. This is best done in the hands of a physical therapist, but often your personal trainer, yoga or Pilates instructor can show you.

How To Do It

Start by standing. Then draw your tummy in slowly so that your pelvis rotates under you until you feel like you can stand up straight with no strain in your neck and a small arch in your back without tension in your mid-back. It is very important that you use the muscles in your tummy to move your pelvis into the correct position. It is also important that you are not clenching your abdominal muscles tightly, but gently drawing them in so that your tummy is somewhat flat.

Congratulations! Now hold it all day.

Warning: it will take you six months to build the endurance to be able to do this all day. These bracing muscles need to build the endurance to hold you in this position for many hours. Much like preparing for an endurance race like a marathon, this doesn’t happen in 6 days or 6 weeks. It takes 6 months. You have to build blood flow to muscles to get endurance. Circulation training. But it is worth it.

Correct pelvic position will change your posture and correct posture will change your life. A 180 degree turn in your life — for the better — in 180 days.

Seek Out A Professional To Assist

These concepts and instruction can be difficult to understand just reading an article or seeing pictures.

You really must have a professional put their hands on you and show you where your pelvis should be. Where you are weak, where you are tight and what you need to work on to obtain the goals you seek. As with most things worth doing, it is not easy and requires a commitment.

But unlike ‘just sit up straight,’ this advice will actually work.

 

Sean Wheeler, M.D. is board certified in both Pain Management and Sports Medicine. He is a leading expert on back pain and his recently released book UPRISE is changing the way the world approaches back pain. With a new vocabulary and new medical approach, Dr. Wheeler puts patients back in charge of their health to achieve liberation from chronic back pain. His middle son, Sammy, is a little pensive about having his shirtless photos spread across the world wide web.

Published in The Posture Series

Dr Sean Wheeler MaggieFashion icon Maggie Wheeler, demonstrating great postureThe POSTURE Series, No. 1

By Sean M. Wheeler, M.D.

Chronic back pain patients often tell me they want to work on their posture.

They say it in the same way someone says they want to lose 10 pounds. Off-handed and nonchalant, like someone with good intentions who forgets to floss. They want to sit up straighter, but then their day gets busy and they forget.

Posture Awareness

The success and popularity of my posture collection on Google+ tells me people are becoming aware that maintaining good posture is not as easy as they once thought.

Posture is not just sitting up straighter, it is so much more than that. To have good posture, one must have enough flexibility, stability AND endurance to achieve the necessary positions and keep them all day. They must also have an understanding of what they are trying to accomplish. It is discouraging to think that all one has to do is sit up straight and commit to it, and then fail in this effort day after day.

Posture As Body Barometer

Posture is a barometer of a person’s musculoskeletal system. The ability to maintain good posture throughout the day is a positive signal that much is right. And, conversely, that forward head or the incessant heel strike is as much a sign that something is wrong as a weird rattling noise in a sports car. You can turn the radio up for a while to mask the rattle, but eventually the car is going to break down.

More Posture To Come

In a series of columns to be published here, I will define posture, then stability, and begin to fill in all the blanks so that you may avoid a life consumed by chronic back pain. These 'blanks' are often filled in by comments or questions you may wish to ask, so please don’t hesitate send me your questions directly or @DrSeanWheeler.

So…why is posture so important?

 

Sean Wheeler, M.D. is board certified in both Pain Management and Sports Medicine. He is a leading expert on back pain and his recently released book UPRISE is changing the way the world approaches back pain. With a new vocabulary and new medical approach, Dr. Wheeler puts patients back in charge of their health to achieve liberation from chronic back pain. His youngest daughter, Maggie, has great posture and fashion sense, but a poor understanding of which shoe goes on which foot.

Published in The Posture Series

Dr. Sean Wheeler back pain expertDr. Sean WheelerSports medicine and back pain expert Dr. Sean Wheeler has long been obsessed with pain. How pain, and its absence, affects behavior, competitiveness, and quality of life.

Drawing upon more than a decade of specialized training, patient treatment and medical experience, Dr. Wheeler came to a breakthrough realization of how to effectively treat patients with chronic low back pain.

This realization is the topic of his soon-to-be published book UPRISE.

In his own words from UPRISE, Dr. Wheeler describes his moment of realization:  

A year or two after finishing my pain management fellowship and while practicing sports medicine, I was slated to give a lecture to a large group of physical therapists one weekend.

In preparation for this lecture, I was poring over research papers when I came across an article that caught my eye. It wasn’t the main point of the article that caught my attention; it was an aside that piqued my interest—how most people develop a lack of blood flow to the lumbar spinal discs in the vertebrae by age 35.

This fact gave me pause. It stuck with me, and for the rest of the week I found myself returning to that article. I couldn’t get it out of my head. It kept me up at night. One thing in particular was bothering me: why was there no blood flow to the discs? There had to be a reason the disc was set up this way. After all, there’s no part of the human body that is supposed to move that doesn’t get great blood flow.

I was mulling this over in the car on my way home from the office one night. It was maybe nine o’clock in the evening, and after a long day at work I was fatigued. Maybe it was something about being fatigued and having trouble seeing the road—the contrast between the headlights and the darkness was hard on my eyes—that put me in a trance and allowed me to think more clearly, but something clicked. 

It was suddenly so clear. The discs. The reason discs don’t get ample blood flow is because they aren’t supposed to move.

The problem isn’t that they move too much in some people—it is that they move at all. The lack of blood flow to the discs indicates they are supposed to remain stable. That is what separates those with discs that break down and those with discs that don’t—the former are unstable because the discs are moving.

Moving discs also mean that the discs are heating up. Anything that moves heats up. The parts of your body that move also have blood flow to take that heat away. If there is no blood flow, you can’t take the heat away, and the disc breaks down.

This was my Aha! moment—almost a spiritual realization—that forever changed my thinking about back pain.

And how to effectively treat it. 

Read more soon in Dr. Wheeler's new book UPRISE, or reserve your advance copy at the link.

Published in Dr. Sean Speaks

Shelley Lewis PTShelley L. Lewis, MS, PT Shelley L. Lewis, P.T., is a Director of Physical Therapy, overseeing a staff of 16 physical therapists at four outpatient clinics in greater Kansas City. Early in life Lewis realized how much she loved the study of human anatomy, physiology and kinesiology, a love later pointing to her career. 

With over two decades of experience in treating patients with pain, Lewis has this to say about sports medicine and back pain expert Dr. Sean Wheeler, and Dr. Wheeler's soon-to-be-published book, UPRISE:

In UPRISE, Dr. Sean Wheeler changes the way we look at back pain and musculoskeletal pain. As physical therapists, there has never been "one way" to treat back pain, but often we traditionally focused on 4-6 weeks of stretches, strengthening, and modalities. Instead, Dr. Wheeler focuses on incorporating long-term stabilization into functional activities and sport.

As a result, the diagnosis has changed, the prognosis has changed, even the vocabulary we use with our patients has changed. For example, we now speak of Bracing Muscles in need of Circulation Training. There is no more "core".

This refreshing physical therapy-centered model relies not only upon sports medicine and pain management doctors, but encourages collaboration with other healthcare professionals to offer the patient a period of pain relief, which then allows us to begin the stabilization—or Circulation Training—process. UPRISE offers a fundamental shift in the mind-set of treating back pain sure to impress and influence patients, medical providers, and healthcare insurance carriers worldwide.

Lewis received her Bachelor of Science degree in Biology—Exercise Science from the University of Nebraska, and was awarded her Masters of Science degree in Physical Therapy from the University of Kansas Medical Center School of Professions. 

Building on earlier praise for UPRISE from experts such as the alpha doc to professional athletes Dr. James Andrews, Hall of Fame Coach Bill Snyder, credited as Architect of the Greatest Turnaround in College Football History, award-winning Television Writer and Producer Lynne Litt, and Dr. Marc Valley, who advocates that the healthcare industry — from medical insurance providers to doctors themselves — become familiar with its teachings, UPRISE will soon add a powerful new understanding to the medical treatment of chronic back pain.

Look for Dr. Sean Wheeler's new book UPRISE soon, and reserve your advance copy at the link.

Published in Praise for UPRISE
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